Search
  • Nadine Pierre

Long-Form Content: What Is It?: A Simple Definition




It's a whole new world and as big as a bite. Everywhere is short and agile. We start eating contents long before we have touched our breakfast. We know how to add subtitles in social video edits because we live our lives in silence. Instagram stories are life. So, where does long social content fit in? What is it anyway?

Long-form content in social media is generally classified as longer than the average piece on the platform, be it video content or text. The exact definition of long-form depends a lot on the platform: A 30 -The second content on Instagram would represent a long format while it would be below the average length for YouTube. Think of long video content as between two and 60 minutes or so long. Think about episodes; think about television on social media. On the other hand, long-form copies are longer than a motivational sentence pepped up with a matching emoji.

And why should I care?

It is typical for content marketers to use articles over 2,000 words in the hopes of drawing more attention to their website and appearing as thought leaders on their chosen topic. Interestingly, Pew Research has shown that full-length journalism continues to be popular in our mobile-obsessed society.

However, long format video content on social media does not work like long reads on Medium. We don't necessarily choose to consume it; it is often started by more or less intrusive algorithms or targets on our screens. However, various sources have shown an appetite for more extensive content on social networks; it just depends on posting it on the proper channels.

Platforms are simply trying to satisfy our ever-changing tastes in how we consume content. Still, ad spends, and the opportunities that come with it (hello, in-stream ads) have likely played a much more significant role in product releases. Even if the viewership figures for Watch or IGTV have not shot up, we know that Facebook will continue to earn money with the products to consolidate TV-like television in our everyday behaviour.

Social platforms quickly rolled out new features to support extended TV-like viewing, from the aptly named Facebook Watch to Instagram's IGTV. It's nice to think that platforms want to satisfy our ever-changing tastes in consuming content. But ad spends and the opportunities it offers (hello, in-stream ads) have likely played a much more significant role in product launches.

While the number of viewers for Watch or IGTV has not shot up, we know that Facebook invests money in products over and over again to anchor television-like television in our everyday behaviour.

How to Get the Most Out of Long Social Content

So when should we adopt longer content instead of sticking to 10-second social edits? What does it take to immerse longer than three seconds? I've looked at some content that has impacted the long-form area in hopes of getting closer to defining what drives practical long-term goals for social RM content.

Let me feel

The most common uses for more critical than average content is emotional storytelling. There is an apparent reason for this. Taking your client on an emotional journey to explore a brand narrative is complicated enough on its own, let alone try. devour it in six seconds of edits. Known for its luscious Facebook videos, Buzzfeed has also been producing content for the other end of the scale for a while now. One of the publisher's longest and most-watched videos tells the story of a Holocaust survivor Eva, tells her heartbreaking story in a 15-minute clip that takes the viewer on an emotional rollercoaster ride. The clip has more than 1.8 million views to date and sparked a conversation about human rights. So if brevity is the soul of the joke, is it the long narrative needed to create a more nuanced emotional connection?

Make me think

Using emotional cues isn't the only way to stare at us. Educational content asks a question, listens to the experts, or guides you through some of the most-watched content on YouTube. It gives the creator an air of authority and trustworthiness - what brand wouldn't want that? Unfortunately, people rarely want brands to educate them. Squarespace, a website builder and hosting software, enlisted the help of an expert. Branded Videos sponsors Squarespace YouTuber and Facebook Watch creator Ted Forbes, a photographer who runs a content channel called The Art of Photography. Sponsored videos appear on Ted's Watch channel with a paid association tag, a Squarespace mention, and a shoutout. Facebook Watch enables brands of all sizes to find creators to work with to create sponsored content. An easy way to present a brand to your target audience without spending budget and time on long-term storage d content production.

Let me do

the third category of lengthy social content is one that physically moves you. It is the empowering content that mobilizes, encourages, or stimulates change. It makes you want to go out and get things done. Adventure and outdoor activity brands tend to be the flag. Patagonia at the forefront, telling the story of their brand through breathtaking landscapes and inspiring adventurers who have escaped everyday life to remote places. The following article on a "wolf pack, a family that lives and runs together through the mountains of Colorado," garnered 105,000 views on YouTube and 75,000 on IGTV.

Conclusion

So there you have it—three practical ways to use social content for a long time. And if you're ever in doubt, make sure you have a good story to tell regardless of format, length, or platform.



gif


It's a whole new world and as big as a bite. Everywhere is short and agile. We start eating contents long before we have touched our breakfast. We know how to add subtitles in social video edits because we live our lives in silence. Instagram stories are life. So, where does long social content fit in? What is it anyway?

Long-form content in social media is generally classified as longer than the average piece on the platform, be it video content or text. The exact definition of long-form depends a lot on the platform: A 30 -The second content on Instagram would represent a long format while it would be below the average length for YouTube. Think of long video content as between two and 60 minutes or so long. Think about episodes; think about television on social media. On the other hand, long-form copies are longer than a motivational sentence pepped up with a matching emoji.

And why should I care?

It is typical for content marketers to use articles over 2,000 words in the hopes of drawing more attention to their website and appearing as thought leaders on their chosen topic. Interestingly, Pew Research has shown that full-length journalism continues to be popular in our mobile-obsessed society.

However, long format video content on social media does not work like long reads on Medium. We don't necessarily choose to consume it; it is often started by more or less intrusive algorithms or targets on our screens. However, various sources have shown an appetite for more extensive content on social networks; it just depends on posting it on the proper channels.

Platforms are simply trying to satisfy our ever-changing tastes in how we consume content. Still, ad spends, and the opportunities that come with it (hello, in-stream ads) have likely played a much more significant role in product releases. Even if the viewership figures for Watch or IGTV have not shot up, we know that Facebook will continue to earn money with the products to consolidate TV-like television in our everyday behaviour.

Social platforms quickly rolled out new features to support extended TV-like viewing, from the aptly named Facebook Watch to Instagram's IGTV. It's nice to think that platforms want to satisfy our ever-changing tastes in consuming content. But ad spends and the opportunities it offers (hello, in-stream ads) have likely played a much more significant role in product launches.

While the number of viewers for Watch or IGTV has not shot up, we know that Facebook invests money in products over and over again to anchor television-like television in our everyday behaviour.

How to Get the Most Out of Long Social Content

So when should we adopt longer content instead of sticking to 10-second social edits? What does it take to immerse longer than three seconds? I've looked at some content that has impacted the long-form area in hopes of getting closer to defining what drives practical long-term goals for social RM content.

Let me feel

The most common uses for more critical than average content is emotional storytelling. There is an apparent reason for this. Taking your client on an emotional journey to explore a brand narrative is complicated enough on its own, let alone try. devour it in six seconds of edits. Known for its luscious Facebook videos, Buzzfeed has also been producing content for the other end of the scale for a while now. One of the publisher's longest and most-watched videos tells the story of a Holocaust survivor Eva, tells her heartbreaking story in a 15-minute clip that takes the viewer on an emotional rollercoaster ride. The clip has more than 1.8 million views to date and sparked a conversation about human rights. So if brevity is the soul of the joke, is it the long narrative needed to create a more nuanced emotional connection?

Make me think

Using emotional cues isn't the only way to stare at us. Educational content asks a question, listens to the experts, or guides you through some of the most-watched content on YouTube. It gives the creator an air of authority and trustworthiness - what brand wouldn't want that? Unfortunately, people rarely want brands to educate them. Squarespace, a website builder and hosting software, enlisted the help of an expert. Branded Videos sponsors Squarespace YouTuber and Facebook Watch creator Ted Forbes, a photographer who runs a content channel called The Art of Photography. Sponsored videos appear on Ted's Watch channel with a paid association tag, a Squarespace mention, and a shoutout. Facebook Watch enables brands of all sizes to find creators to work with to create sponsored content. An easy way to present a brand to your target audience without spending budget and time on long-term storage d content production.

Let me do

the third category of lengthy social content is one that physically moves you. It is the empowering content that mobilizes, encourages, or stimulates change. It makes you want to go out and get things done. Adventure and outdoor activity brands tend to be the flag. Patagonia at the forefront, telling the story of their brand through breathtaking landscapes and inspiring adventurers who have escaped everyday life to remote places. The following article on a "wolf pack, a family that lives and runs together through the mountains of Colorado," garnered 105,000 views on YouTube and 75,000 on IGTV.

Conclusion

So there you have it—three practical ways to use social content for a long time. And if you're ever in doubt, make sure you have a good story to tell regardless of format, length, or platform.



gif